Madison Alder, Districts 6-10

Two-year term
Vote for one

Find your district here.

Candidates:

District 6 (click to jump to this district)
Marsha A. Rummel
, Incumbent

District 7 (click to jump to this district)
Badri Lankella
Donna V. Hurd Moreland

District 8 (click to jump to this district)
Avra Reddy
Matthew Mitnick

District 9 (click to jump to this district)
Paul Skidmore
, Incumbent

District 10 (click to jump to this district)
Kristin S. Johnson
Zachary Henak


District 6

Marsha A. Rummel

Madison, WI 53703
marsha.rummel@gmail.com
Facebook: Friends of Marsha Rummel

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? My leadership has jumpstarted commercial, residential and park development in the Capital East District. I successfully preserved the landmarked Garver Feed Mill and sponsored an update to our landmarks ordinance. I served as Council President in 2017-2018 and chaired the President’s Taskforce on Police and Community Relations. I work cooperatively with my Council colleagues on transportation, climate resilience, and equity issues. I enjoy working with neighbors to ensure they have an effective voice in our local democracy. I believe my collaborative style of leadership and progressive values benefits District 6 and the City.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? Global climate change brings weather events that are hotter, colder, wetter, drier and more devastating than predicted. We need to drastically alter our consumption and production practices based on fossil fuels before there is planet wide ecological collapse. This summer’s flooding events and the huge costs for the city and residents got everyone’s attention. Safe drinking water is a crucial resource. We must reduce salt usage during winter. We need to transition to renewable energy sources like solar through programs like MadiSun. The city is investing in a green fleet using electric buses and trucks. Invest in bus rapid transit.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Program changes in the delivery of paratransit services, intertwined with a decrease in federal funding, have created uncertainty and fear among Madison’s most vulnerable transit riders. With the implementation of Family Care in Dane County, approximately $3.9 million in pass-through federal funding that Dane County shared with Metro Transit for paratransit is no longer available. The State of Wisconsin is utilizing Managed Care Organizations (MCOs) to directly administer service and funds for Family Care members. Destinations within ¾ mile of Metro’s core fixed-route service area will continue to be eligible for paratransit service but at a higher fare.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? We need to listen to people of color to resolve the disparities of Two Madison’s and dismantle our separate and unequal city. We need to collaborate with the black and brown community members to develop strategies to increase educational and job opportunities, reduce incarceration rates, and build community capacity. I will strive to be accountable to communities of color as we work together to change the institutional structures of racism and intersections of oppression in society. I believe “We make the road by walking” and must use our collective power to make the city we all want to live in.


District 7

Badri Lankella

Madison, WI 53719
vote4badri@gmail.com
www.vote4badri.com

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? As a 10-year resident of the district 7, serving as a board member of homeowner’s association, school PTO and FACE teams, I’ve local knowledge of current issues in the community. As a trained professional in Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering and Masters in Business Administration, along with 20 years of work experience, I’m well prepared to make leadership contributions to support city council.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? I’ll work with the city council to increase the city’s resilience and raise awareness of climate change risks and encourage infrastructure improvements.

I’ll work with the council in expanding Compost Program for the entire city and initiating incentives for installing solar panels and renewable energy options for residents.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Installing Accessible Pedestrian Signals (APS) as listed in this article (https://madison.com/ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/with-accessible-pedestrian-signals-visually-impaired-pedestrians-can-safely-cross/article_d0ff15ce-37df-5a86-8e13-5c7658f6d87e.html) not only helps people with a disability it also helps kids who cross multiple lanes of traffic in the dark, on icy roads twice a day to get to the school bus stop.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? 
1. Create Affordable and Accessible Housing
2. Free Vocational Training and Transportation
3. Special consideration to minority and Women in Education, Job Training and Employment
City Council should address these prominent issues, by creating opportunities to underprivileged, minority and woman entrepreneurs. Establishing programs that would give vocational education to underprivileged, preference to minority and women-owned business on city contract projects.


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Donna V. Hurd Moreland

Madison, WI 53719
donnav@donnafordistrict7.com
www.donnafordistrict7.com

Watch the Know Your Candidates interview with Donna V. Hurd Moreland.

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office?  Since arriving in Madison in January of 2002, I have been engaged in the community. My positions as a law firm Office Administrator, Executive Director and currently, Director of Administration requires strong written and verbal communication skills, good listening skills, sound judgement and the ability to examine situations from varying perspectives before deciding the best course of action. These skills have also informed my volunteer work in the community. Our community is comprised of people from every socioeconomic level and it is important to strive to view issues from all perspectives.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? I would ensure that experts are always at the table. Staying informed and asking questions will be integral to my understanding of the micro and macro consequences of climate change and how our behaviors can contribute to or mitigate the adverse effects. I will encourage Madison citizens to take note of what is happening based on fact, not conjecture.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Yes. There needs to be a better routing system that will afford commuters more direct routes. The transfer points do not seem to be as efficient as they could or should be. The incentive, for example, for me to use public transportation is just not there. The difference in my commute is a matter of 20 minutes (driving) as opposed to a 1 hour and 26 minutes commute using public tranportation. I will have to conduct more research as it relates to how the current transit system supports people with disabilities, which I will make a priority.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? Other important issues confronting Madison is the lack of affordable housing, lack of community (i.e., belonging, commitment), people are not engaged in issues that affect them because of marginalization. In addition, far too many citizens aren't making a living wage, which has a ripple effect throughout all aspects of their lives. The gaps between the haves and have nots continues to increase. Far too many children are experiencing homelessness and hunger.


District 8

AvraReddy.jpg

Avra Reddy

Madison, WI 53706
avraforcitycouncil@gmail.com
avraformadison.com
Facebook: Avra Reddy for City Council
Twitter: @avra_reddy

Watch the Know Your Candidates interview with Avra Reddy.

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? While I was in high school, I served as student representative to my district's school board. In that position, I advocated for the interests of the student body on issues of relevance to us. Now that I'm running for Alder in the student dominated 8th district, I want to apply those same skills to representing UW students on Madison's Common Council. Students have vital concerns about issues ranging from affordable housing to environmental sustainability, and I want to bring those voices to the city level to make sure everyone can be a part of our government.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? We've already seen the devastation climate change can cause in Madison. The flooding last summer should serve as a wake up call that the need for rapid, decisive environmental action isn't 5, 10 or 20 years away, its here and now. Massive failure to act on climate change at the national level means that cities must take the lead in proposing solutions to the crisis that is only going to get worse. To that end, I wholeheartedly support the efforts of the Sustainable Madison committee to get city operations to 100% renewable energy in the next few years.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Public transit is a vital part of how Madison's residents get around, and the need for increased investment in buses and para-transit is only logical considering the growth Madison is projected to experience in the next 10 years. In addition to expanded service, we also need to implement Bus Rapid Transit, which would introduce high-capacity limited-stop bus lines on commuter routes. In order to make Madison accessible to all, it's imperative that we design the future of Madison's public transit with the needs of disabled residents at the forefront of our mind, and not as an afterthought.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? Many of Madison's residents struggle to find affordable housing near places of work, and as a result the opportunity of disadvantaged populations is limited. We must bring affordable housing for all to Madison; not only to address current shortcomings but also to prepare the city for a future of record growth. There's a number of ways the city can address the cost of rent: when I'm on council I'll support the Affordable Housing fund, prioritize high density development to increase the rental supply, and look into ways the city can support housing cooperatives for low to moderate income residents.


Matthew Mitnick

Madison, WI 53706
mitnick4madison@gmail.com
www.matthewmitnick.com
Facebook: Mitnick for Madison
Twitter: @matthewmitnick_

Watch the Know Your Candidates interview with Matthew Mitnick.

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? It is my passion to serve others. I formed a nonprofit chapter to provide unique experiences to low income youth and founded the International City / County Management Association Student Chapter at UW-Madison to excite students about local government. I spent last election season interning for the Wisconsin League of Conservation Voters to get environmentally conscious candidates elected. I also was an intern for the Associated Students of Madison last semester, working to help housing insecure students. Through these experiences, I have developed a platform centered around LGBTQ+ and women’s rights, affordable housing, “housing first” initiatives, sustainable development, and environmental conservation.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? Climate change should be taken seriously because it affects all of us. Education is key, as prevention is always easier, cheaper, and more feasible than the cleanup. I will promote recycling and consumer waste education programs to educate residents about the lasting marks they leave on their communities. I support composting, net-zero emissions, and sustainable development initiatives. I believe in flood preventive measures, such as rain gardens and proper leaf removal to limit the phosphorus / fertilizers that run off into our lakes. It is important to maintain green spaces and our fantastic parks, as they allow for more inclusive communities.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Bus Rapid Transit, bike paths, and pedestrian friendly walkways are efficient for residents’ commute times and budgets. By having design and oversight committees with members from all different backgrounds and identities, decisions are made with an equity lens in mind. I will push for ramps, priority boarding, service animals, and audio / visual communication. It is essential to check in with residents about their satisfaction with city services. Strong rider input leads to strong rider buy-in. I support travel training programs to help those with disabilities overcome their fears and concerns, consistent maintenance to ensure signs are legible, and ADA adherence.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? I want to expand student participation and engagement with city leadership. I want to see everyone not just get involved, but have their voices heard. City leaders must abide by a strong commitment to ethics. I believe in economic justice because all residents should have access to affordable housing - especially students. I will fight for TIF funding and co-op housing to increase options, as no student should be housing insecure. Public safety is my top priority. I want late night transit, emergency buttons that can be accessed on mobile devices, and student safety committees so everyone can share their perspective.


District 9

PaulSkidmore.jpg

Paul Skidmore

Madison, WI 53717

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? I have extensive public and private experience in issues that are important in public service. I have served as alder of the 9th district for the past 17+ years. I currently serve on the Public Safety Review Commission, Finance Committee, and the Alcohol License Review Committee. I am a vocal advocate for public safety and economic development. I am a home owner in my district (Tamarack). I am very active in community issues, particularly public safety, public services, and business development. I own and operate my own small business.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? I would prepare Madison for the consequences of climate change in two ways: 1) Work to encourage that we reduce our public and private contribution to climate change through energy conservation and by developing and utilizing alternative energy sources, and 2) preparing long range management plans to mitigate the impact of climate change: a. stormwater management, b. water conservation (quality and quantity), c. preservation of natural ecological systems, d. development of sustainable, local food sources, and e. use of natural and renewable energy sources.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Madison has the foundation for a solid, assessable, public transit system in Madison Metro. We currently have the infrastructure (road network), the hardware (bus fleet), and the personnel (drivers and administration) to move many people throughout the City and surrounding communities efficiently, safely, and cleanly. This system is flexible, and we would be able modify the transit routes to meet future needs. We have the ability to upgrade this system to a Bus Rapid Transit system (BRT) that could move more passengers faster, smoother, and more efficiently through larger and more efficient accessible busses and barrier-free boarding stations.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? Madison has several important issues that require our attention. 1) Public Safety: Madison has become a big City, and we are facing big City criminal activity. We need to modify our response to meet these problems, 2) Economic Development: Madison is experiencing growth in high-tech employment, but our retail sector (particularly malls) is facing challenges from on-line shoppers. We need to be flexible to address the impact of these changes on our community, and 3) Housing: We have a shortage of affordable housing in the City. We need to support a wide range of housing options throughout the City.


District 10

Kristin S. Johnson

Madison, WI 53711
hello@kristinforalder.com
kristinforalder.com
Facebook: Kristin Johnson
Twitter: @kristinsjohnson

Watch the Know Your Candidates interview with Kristin S. Johnson.

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? I have lived and worked in Madison since 1990. My qualifications include decades of real-world experience as a mother, entrepreneur, and proponent for progressive causes in our city. I have a Bachelor of Science in Nutritional Sciences from the University of Wisconsin - Madison, and extensive experience owning and working for small businesses.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? With the University of Wisconsin at our doorstep, Madison is renown for its environmental and climate change research. On the council, I will support collaborating with experts in the scientific community and within government on the county, state, and federal levels to reduce our carbon footprint, be proactive with flood prevention, and create sustainable communities. Initiatives utilizing more permeable surfaces in landscaping and development would have a dramatic impact in controlling rainwater runoff and decreasing flooding.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Implementation of Bus Rapid Transit (BRT), improving ADA Paratransit Service, and creating transit enhancements such as shelters, signage, and scheduling would benefit Madison's residents, especially those with mobility challenges and other health concerns. An accessible city is vital to improving the socio-economic and racial disparities that Madison currently struggles with.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? The escalating demand for housing in Madison must be addressed. Increasing property assessments and taxes burden current homeowners, making maintaining housing and independence a concern among many. Renters struggle to find affordable apartments, where one out of every three spend more than 50 percent of their income on rent. Supporting both market-rate and affordable housing initiatives, as well as improved public transportation between home, work, and school for everyone, will be my priority.


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Zachary Henak

Madison, WI 53711
Zachary.henak@gmail.com
www.zacharyhenakmadisonalder.com 

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? I am a passionate hard working individual who cares deeply about people. I am involved in the community and seek out ways to bring people together. I currently serve as Treasurer for my Neighborhood Association, co-President of The Nakoma League and am active on the Thoreau PTO. Before moving to Madison 3 years ago, I served my community as a volunteer Firefighter/EMT, Air National Guardsman, and worked in elementary education. I have degrees in Economics, Finance and Leadership with correlating professional experience. For the past 4 years I have been raising my young sons ages 1 and 4.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? Climate change is a real threat to our City as we found out this past summer. As Alder I will work to take our changing climate into account through encouraging sustainable development practices, healthy and efficient transportation and preservation of our green spaces and extensive parks system. I will also advocate for our dedicated emergency services personal and disaster preparedness through proper support and funding. Madison is already doing wonderful things in the realm of sustainability, we must continue to grow these initiatives while also upgrading out infrastructure to meet the new challenges of our changing climate.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Transportation is a cornerstone to any thriving city. It must serve and be accessible to everyone. In 2017 Metro anticipated a loss of 3.9M in funding due to the implementation of Family Care Dane County(FCDC). The reason for the anticipated loss was that previously, Medicaid paratransit rides had been contracted through Metro. With the implementation of FCDC those rides were given to private agencies who were more competitive or adaptable to individuals needs. I would work to sustain a high level of service to our paratransit clientele, and take into account the effects and services of private providers for FCDC.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? We have many community, non-profit, and philanthropic organizations in Madison. What we lack at times is the ability to work together towards a common goal. I will work with The Council to encourage city sponsored organizations to find common ground and work together in order to efficiently utilize resources, and have greater impact. I also see opportunities within neighborhood associations(NA). By providing NA’s with information on city activity in their neighborhood, they can assist with neighborhood input/consideration as well as information dissemination. I will consider this and other council/staff recommended strategies to broaden participation from neighborhoods.