Madison Alder, District 3

Two-year term
Vote for one

(Find your district here)

Candidates:

District 3
Lindsay Lemmer
Jared Schumacker
Mike Cerro


LindsayLemmer.jpg

Lindsay Lemmer

Madison, WI 53714
hello@lindsayforalder.com
lindsayforalder.com
Facebook: Lindsay Lemmer for Alder

Watch the Know Your Candidates interview with Lindsay Lemmer.

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? I have a background of community leadership, advocacy and bringing about meaningful change. As the president of the Madison and Wisconsin chapters of the National Organization for Women I’ve worked with local and state officials to influence policy and build community awareness of how they will be impacted by legislation. I’ve helped lead other local efforts, including access to voting with the Dane County Voter ID Coalition. My experience in communications will help me in building opportunities for community engagement. I have a Master of Business Administration which will assist me in being a careful steward of public tax dollars.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? Madison is already experiencing the deleterious consequences of climate change. I would prioritize better ways of managing our stormwater, helping new developments to be energy efficient, and reducing our carbon emissions. I would advocate for installing green engineering solutions as we update roads, and increasing the usage of pervious pavement alternatives which allow water to reach the ground. 

I would champion reducing emissions by improving our public transportation, bike and pedestrian paths.

I would support programs that have proven to be effective such as MadiSUN, which helps residents and businesses utilize solar power, and available financing options for green initiatives.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Madison has been growing rapidly, with an increase of 47,000 more residents between 2000 and 2017. Our public transit system has not received the investment or prioritization necessary. This lack of investment especially puts people with disabilities at a disadvantage, as well as seniors, those with low incomes, and communities of color. If we want to be an equitable, inclusive, and accessible city, prioritizing our public transit is direly needed. It’s a must to support the city’s growth, and it will bolster a strong economy. I would champion this investment, including advocating for the Bus Rapid Transit plan.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? Madison has a housing crisis. It’s difficult to rent, expensive to buy, and increasingly difficult to stay in our homes with increasing assessment values and high property taxes, especially for folks on fixed incomes.

Nearly half of Madison’s estimated 2,400 homeless population are children.

As alder, I’ll champion comprehensive plans to increase access to both market-rate and affordable housing. We need to make sure Madison’s Racial Equity and Social Justice Initiative (RESJI) framework is consistently applied. I would also pursue incentives for landlords and management companies to help them make the right choices.


Jared Schumacker.jpg

Jared Schumacker

Madison, WI 53718
jared@jared4madison.com
www.jared4madison.com
Facebook: Jared Schumacker Candidate for Alder of Madison District 3

Watch the Know Your Candidates interview with Jared Schumacker.

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? I have worked in sales and management for most of my adult life. I have built relationships with people who come back to me years later and are from all walks of life, from all over the country. My current job has me traveling anywhere within a 75 mile radius of Madison and building relationships by speaking with people from all over the area. I love talking about politics, being in the living room with four or five people talking about issues that impact us and coming up with solutions that are equitable for everyone.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? We can look to our neighbors to the south, Fitchburg. Solar panels on municipal building cost the city less than $600,000, but will save the city millions. Regulations for Future construction projects to make buildings rely on more sources of renewable power. Committing to all city vehicles as electric/hybrid or biofuel within 10 years. Expanding mass transits plans such as BRT making them accessible to all residents. Overhauling sanitation to reclaim energy from methane sources as well as less garbage in landfills. Making Madison green, tree planting to sequester CO2 and make Madison beautiful.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Looking to the private sector for people with disabilities such as the ride sharing companies similar to ones for getting to the doctor. Making sure that BRT is going to be available to people with disabilities. Increasing frequency of transit to lower income areas such as North and South transfer points. Examining our route system to see if there is a more efficient way to get Madison commuters around as rides can sometimes take upwards of an hour and a half. Lowering the cost of the para-transit system and increasing its efficiency.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? The cost of living in Madison, but more specifically the cost of housing. Rates for rent have risen drastically in the past few decades. A rental in 2000 that may have cost $900, now could cost $1500. Tax incentives and public funds have not always worked, but working with developers to build affordable housing must be key. Legislative actions requiring a larger portion of new building be affordable will be on the table with me. If developers are unwilling, then searching out developers from outside the city is the direction I would go.


Mike Cerro

Madison, WI 53714
MikeCerro4MadisonD3@Outlook.com
mike4madison.com

1. What in your professional and community background qualifies you for this elective office? I’m a Madison native, and a UW-Madison graduate in mechanical engineering. I’ve lived in several District 3 subdivisions for 40 years; Covered Bridge, Sprecher East, and Rolling Meadows. As a volunteer for several decades, I enjoy giving my time toward the betterment of the neighborhoods. I have given my time toward various community organizations by volunteering for a local youth hockey association, the Covered Bridge subdivision, and McClellan/North Star Park Neighborhood Association. Presently, I volunteer with the Adopt Ice Partnership Volunteers. I enjoy helping to provide for a clean, safe, and high quality future for our children and for everyone.

2. How would you plan to prepare Madison for predicted consequences of climate change? Madison, along with all cities and Dane County, needs to do its part to conserve, recycle and reuse whenever reasonable, and where possible. The unpredictability of the weather makes us all speculate what might happen next, and how we can do our part. Working with the State and County governments to perform local risk assessments, and review the lessons learned from these periods of extreme weather, can help prepare us for this unpredictability. Smart engineering practices, intelligent uses of our resources, and proper water management, all combined should continue to be reviewed, and wherever practical changes then put into affect.

3. Are any changes needed in Madison’s public transit system, especially for people with disabilities? Madison should look at volunteer transportation aides to provide transportation assistance. Volunteer aides can educate riders with disabilities on how to use the transit system, and provide additional passenger assistance when needed. Volunteer transportation aides would have the ability to ride for free, provided they fulfill a minimum number of hours of service. Other communities have had success in recruiting student volunteers from the local colleges and nursing programs. The volunteers find these real-life experiences valuable, and supplement their classroom instruction. On-board aides can offer assistance when requested and also provide assistance for the rider to exit the bus.

4. What other important issue faces Madison, and what could the Madison City Council do to address it? Madison has several issues that it shares with the country; the opioid epidemic, alcoholism, and providing adequate and timely emergency response for residents. Madison needs to work with Dane County to ensure resources are provided to help those addicted to opiods and alcohol dependency. Madison has a significant commuter population; over 60,000 commuters enter the city every workday, swelling our community by adding nearly 25% to the city’s population. Madison’s emergency services do not presently have sufficient staffing levels to account for this tidal-wave entering the city daily, and along with the addiction crisis, they’re in need of additional resources.